Horn Rapids Solar, Storage & Training Center

Integration of Large-Scale Solar
The Horn Rapids Solar, Storage & Training Project in Richland provides Washington state its first opportunity to integrate a large-scale solar and storage facility into its clean mix of hydro, nuclear and wind resources. This first-of-its-kind kind facility combines solar generation with battery storage and technician training.

 
“This first-of-its-kind kind facility combines solar generation with battery storage and technician training.”
 

The site is just north of Richland, on land owned by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers and leased by the Regional Education & Training Center. The project will be a 4-megawatt electric, 20-acre solar generating array of photovoltaic panels that will provide enough energy to power 600 Richland homes. The project will also include a 1-MWe battery storage system; and serve as a training ground for solar and battery technicians throughout the nation. The combination of photovoltaic solar with battery storage will provide a predictable, renewable generating resource.

During September 2018 the City of Richland agreed to be the power off-taker of the project. Final approval of the project and participants agreement will go before the Energy Northwest board of directors and executive board, respectively, during October 2018.

Construction & Costs
In 2017, as part of its Clean Energy Fund, the state Department of Commerce granted up to $3 million in matching funds to develop the estimated $6½ million project. Construction is scheduled to begin during the fall of 2019, and end during early 2020.

Solar Generation
Potelco, a utility construction company based in Sumner, near Seattle, will build the 4-megawatt solar portion of the project next to the Regional Education Training Center. It will be owned by a private entity. Power from the project will supply the battery system and, through interconnection with the city of Richland’s energy distribution system, will be a source of energy for local loads.

Energy Storage
Energy Northwest will own and operate the co-located battery storage system. The system will smooth the solar output, shift off-peak solar energy generation to times when the energy is needed, and help reduce peak energy demand. The 1-megawatt electric, 4-megawatt-hour system will power 150 homes for four hours.

Professional Training
Richland’s Regional Education Training Center, a non-profit organization focused on training new and incumbent workers, will create a curriculum for solar and battery storage technicians. Training will cover plant construction, operations, maintenance, and safety and hazard prevention. Hundreds of workers from throughout the United States are expected to train annually at the center. Training dollars brought into the Tri-Cities are estimated at about $3 million per year.

“Hundreds of workers from throughout the United States are expected to train annually at the center.”


National Research
Working together, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland and the University of Washington’s Clean Energy Institute will monitor and analyze data from the project to develop improved battery designs and advanced tools for forecasting load, price, and solar in-feed.

 
 
 
 
 
 

P-Bullet.jpg Quick Facts

Solar Facility:
4 megawatts
 
Energy Storage:
1-megawatt electric, 4-megawatt-hour system
 
Location:
Richland, Wash.